Hi Lo BBQ / Lazy Bear

The 1800 SF restaurant interior was inspired by the unique cathedral-like space of the original 1900 building. Previously housing a Filipino-American Hall, we exposed the roof’s wood framing , and chose materials to achieve a raw-modern-warm style that echoed Hi Lo Chef  Scott Youkilis’ sophisticated global take on rustic barbeque.

The rich material palette features charred cedar plank siding (aka “Shou Sugi Ban”, an ancient Japanese wood preservation technique, and a visual metaphor for BBQ), hand plastered walls , salvaged tin, rustic/industrial recycled gas cap pendant lights,  and communal white oak tables with salvaged 10″ square douglas fir beams as bases. These highly textural elements contrast with the mezzanine’s sleek glass railing and custom amber glass apothecary bottle chandelier, designed by the architects, with 1100 amber apothecary bottles sourced from San Francisco’s own ScrapSF.

A year after opening, the owners of Lazy Bear, approached Hi Lo, offering to purchase the renovated restaurant space. We, along with  Colling Design/Build, Small Batch Creative, and the clients, kept the strongest design elements of the former Hi Lo space and added key Lazy Bear camp/scout/lodge elements, mixed with a mid-century vibe. The POS counter was removed to foster the interactive, creative epicurean  philosophy. The upstairs mezzanine was reimagined as a living room/ pre-dinner lounge space. Hosting  two “dinner party” seatings each night,  table layout is simplified with  2 large communal tables in the middle of the dining room.

Project Description

Charred Cedar Walls and a 7000 lb smoker meet in a globally-influenced BBQ joint.

The 1800 SF restaurant interior was inspired by the unique cathedral-like space of the original 1900 building. Previously housing a Filipino-American Hall, we exposed the roof’s wood framing , and chose materials to achieve a raw-modern-warm style that echoed Hi Lo Chef  Scott Youkilis’ sophisticated global take on rustic barbeque.

The rich material palette features charred cedar plank siding (aka “Shou Sugi Ban”, an ancient Japanese wood preservation technique, and a visual metaphor for BBQ), hand plastered walls , salvaged tin, rustic/industrial recycled gas cap pendant lights,  and communal white oak tables with salvaged 10″ square douglas fir beams as bases. These highly textural elements contrast with the mezzanine’s sleek glass railing and custom amber glass apothecary bottle chandelier, designed by the architects, with 1100 amber apothecary bottles sourced from San Francisco’s own ScrapSF.

A year after opening, the owners of Lazy Bear, approached Hi Lo, offering to purchase the renovated restaurant space. We, along with  Colling Design/Build, Small Batch Creative, and the clients, kept the strongest design elements of the former Hi Lo space and added key Lazy Bear camp/scout/lodge elements, mixed with a mid-century vibe. The POS counter was removed to foster the interactive, creative epicurean  philosophy. The upstairs mezzanine was reimagined as a living room/ pre-dinner lounge space. Hosting  two “dinner party” seatings each night,  table layout is simplified with  2 large communal tables in the middle of the dining room.

Project Details

CLIENT: Hi Lo BBQ
CONTRACTOR: S4S Construction
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: S4S Construction
FOOD SERVICE: KRBS
SHELL ARCHITECT: Adamson Molina
PHOTOGRAPHER: Eurydice Galka
PRESS
SF Weekly
The walls are lined with burnt and shellacked cedar for a visually striking smokehouse vibe, and the high-vaulted ceilings and windows give the room an airy, cathedral-like atmosphere.
Serious Eats
The space leads to a convivial atmosphere—the sleek, high-ceilinged restaurant evokes a funky, minimalist barn, with an upstairs mezzanine and warm wood communal tables to ensure maximum space to chow down.
SF Eater
The Atmosphere News: Yelper Yea A. likes that the "casual yet chic atmosphere" is "good for dining alone, in groups, or even for a date."
LOCATION